Contributors

Linda Martín Alcoff is Professor of Philosophy at the City University of New York. Her most recent book is The Future of Whiteness.

Frederick Luis Aldama is University Distinguished Scholar and Arts and Humanities Distinguished Professor at The Ohio State University. His most recent book is The Routledge Companion to Latina/o Popular Culture.

Frances R. Aparicio is Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and Director of the Latina and Latino Studies Program at Northwestern University. She is completing a manuscript entitled “Relational Latinidades: Unearthing Intralatino/a Lives in Chicago.”

José F. Aranda Jr. is Associate Professor in the Departments of English and Spanish and Portuguese at Rice University. He has completed a manuscript entitled “The Places of Modernity in Early Mexican American Literature.”

Alicia Arrizón is Professor in the Department of Gender and Sexuality Studies at the University of California, Riverside. Her most recent book is Queering Mestizaje: Transculturation and Performance.

Manuel G. Avilés-Santiago is Assistant Professor of Communication and Culture at Arizona State University. He is the author of Puerto Rican Soldiers and Second-Class Citizenship: Representations in Media.

Mary Beltrán is Associate Professor of Radio-Television- Film at the University of Texas at Austin. She is the author of Latina/o Stars in U.S. Eyes: The Making and Meanings of Film and TV Stardom.

Maylei Blackwell is Associate Professor of Chicana/o Studies and Women’s Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. She is the author of ¡Chicana Power!: Contested Histories of Feminism in the Chicano Movement.

Mary Pat Brady is Associate Professor in the Department of English and Director of the Latino Studies Program  at Cornell University. She is the author of Extinct Lands, Temporal Geographies: Chicana Literature and the Urgency of Space.

Ginetta E. B. Candelario is Associate Professor of Sociology and Latin American and Latina/o Studies  at Smith College. She is the author of Black behind the Ears: Dominican Racial Identity from Beauty Shops to Museums.

Dolores Inés Casillas is Associate Professor of Chicana/o Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is the author of Sounds of Belonging: U.S. Spanish- Language Radio and Public Advocacy.

Mari Castañeda is Professor and Department Chair of Communication  at  the  University  of Massachusetts, Amherst. She is co-editor of Soap Operas and Telenovelas in the Digital Age: Global Industries and New Audiences.

Maria Elena Cepeda is Associate Professor of Latina/o Studies at Williams College. Her most recent book is The Routledge Companion to Latina/o Media.

Sheila Marie Contreras is Associate Professor of English and Associate Dean for Diversity, Inclusion, and Community Engagement at Michigan State University. She is the author of Blood Lines: Myth, Indigenism and Chicana/o Literature.

Raúl Coronado is Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of A World Not to Come: A History of Latino Writing and Print Culture.

María Cotera is Associate Professor of American Culture, Latina/o Studies, and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She is the author of Native Speakers: Ella Deloria, Zora Neale Hurston, Jovita González, and the Poetics of Culture.

Arnaldo Cruz-Malavé is Professor of Spanish and Comparative Literature at Fordham University. His most recent book is Queer Latino Testimonio, Keith Haring, and Juanito Xtravaganza: Hard Tails.

Arlene Dávila is Professor of Anthropology and Media Studies at New York University. Her most recent book is El Mall: The Spatial and Class Politics of Shopping Malls in Latin America.

Nicholas De Genova is Reader in Urban Geography at King’s College, London. He is the author of Working the Boundaries: Race, Space, and “Illegality” in Mexican Chicago.

Theresa Delgadillo is Professor in the Department of Comparative Studies at The Ohio State University. She is the author of Spiritual Mestizaje: Religion, Gender, Race, and Nation in Contemporary Chicana Narrative.

Zaire Z. Dinzey-Flores is Associate Professor of Sociology and Latino and Caribbean Studies at Rutgers University. She is the author of Locked In, Locked Out: Gated Communities in a Puerto Rican City.

Julie A. Dowling is Associate Professor of Latina/Latino Studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. She is the author of Mexican Americans and the Question of Race.

John A. García is Research Professor Emeritus at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. The third edition of his Latino Politics in America: Community, Culture, and Interests appeared in 2017.

Shannon Gleeson is Associate Professor of Labor Relations, Law, and History at the Cornell University School of Industrial and Labor Relations. Her most recent book is Precarious Claims: The Promise and Failure of Workplace Protections in the United States.

Rita Gonzalez is Curator and Acting Department Head of Contemporary Art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. She has curated numerous exhibitions including Asco: Elite of the Obscure, A Retrospective.

Nicole M. Guidotti-Hernández  is  Associate  Professor of American Studies and Chair of the Department of Mexican American and Latina/o Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. She is the author of Unspeakable Violence: Remapping U.S. and Mexican National Imaginaries.

Laura G. Gutiérrez is Associate Professor of Latin American and Latina/o Performance Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. She is the author of Performing Mexicanidad: Vendidas y Cabareteras on the Transnational Stage.

Joshua Javier Guzmán is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He is completing a manuscript tentatively titled Suspending Satisfaction: Queer Latino Performance and the Politics of Style.

Michael Hames-García is  Professor of  Ethnic Studies at the University of Oregon. His most recent book is Identity Complex: Making the Case for Multiplicity.

Ramona Hernández is Professor of Sociology and Director of the Dominican Studies Institute at the City College of New York. Her book on Ellis Island Dominicans: Money, Power, and Color is forthcoming.

Tanya Katerí Hernández is Professor of Law at the Fordham University School of Law. She is the author of Racial Subordination in Latin America: The Role of the State, Customary Law, and the New Civil Rights Response.

Norma Iglesias Prieto is Professor in  the Department  of Chicana and Chicano Studies at San Diego State University. She is the author of  Beautiful  Flowers  of the Maquiladoras: Life Histories of Women Workers in Tijuana.

Zilkia Janer is Professor of Global Studies and Geography at Hofstra University. Her most recent book is Latino Food Culture.

Nancy Kang is Assistant Professor of Multicultural and Diaspora Literatures at the University of Baltimore. She is co-author with Silvio Torres-Saillant of The Once and Future Muse: The Poetry and Poetics of Rhina P. Espaillat.

Lawrence La Fountain-Stokes  is  Associate  Professor of American Culture, Latina/o Studies, Romance Languages and Literatures, and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He is the author of Queer Ricans: Cultures and Sexualities in the Diaspora.

Lázaro Lima is the E. Claiborne Robins Distinguished Chair in the Liberal Arts at the University of Richmond. His books include The Latino Body: Crisis Identities in American Literary and Cultural Memory.

María Lugones is a philosopher and popular educator. She is the author of Pilgrimages-Peregrinajes: Theorizing Coalition against Multiple Oppressions.

Nelson Maldonado-Torres is Associate Professor of Latino and Caribbean Studies  and  Comparative  Literature at Rutgers University. He is the author of Against War: Views from the Underside of Modernity.

Lillian Manzor is Associate Professor in Modern Languages and Literatures and Director of the Cuban Theater Digital Archive at the University of  Miami.  She is completing a manuscript entitled “Marginality beyond Return: U.S. Cuban Performances and Politics.”

Curtis Marez is Professor of Ethnic Studies at the University of California, San Diego. His most recent book is Farm Worker Futurism: Speculative Technologies of Resistance.

Anne M. Martínez is Assistant Professor of American Culture  and  Cultural  Theory  at  the  University  of Groningen. She is the author of Catholic Borderlands: Mapping Catholicism onto American Empire, 1905–1935.

John Mckiernan-Gonzalez is Associate Professor of History at Texas State University. He is the author of Fevered Measures: Public Health and Race at the Texas- Mexico  Border, 1848–1942.

Cecilia Menjívar is Foundation Distinguished Professor of Sociology at the University of Kansas. Her most recent publications include the co-authored book Immigrant Families.

Nancy Raquel Mirabal is Associate Professor of American Studies and Director of the U.S. Latina/o Studies Program at the University of Maryland, College Park. She is the author of Suspect Freedoms: The Racial and Sexual Politics of Cubanidad in New York, 1823–1957.

Sergio de la Mora is Associate Professor of Chicana and Chicano Studies at the University of California, Davis. He is the author of Cinemachismo: Masculinities and Sexuality in Mexican Film.

John Nieto-Phillips is Associate Professor of History and Latino Studies at Indiana University. His current book project examines how Latinas/os figured into global Hispanist networks and U.S. language rights struggles.

Urayoán Noel is Associate Professor of English and Spanish and Portuguese at New York University. He is the author of In Visible Movement: Nuyorican Poetry from the Sixties to Slam.

B. V. Olguín is Professor in the English Department and Honors College at the University of Texas, San Antonio. His latest book, Violentologies: Violence and Ontology in Latina/o Literature, Film, and Popular Culture, is under review.

Randy J. Ontiveros is Associate Professor of English at the University of Maryland. He is the author of In the Spirit of a New People: The Cultural Politics of the Chicano Movement.

Ricardo L. Ortíz is Associate Professor of U.S. Latin-x Literature and Culture and Chair of the English Department at Georgetown University. He is currently working on Testimonial Fictions: Cold War Geopolitics and U.S. Latin-x Literature.

Gina M. Pérez is Professor of Comparative American Studies at Oberlin College. Her most recent book is Citizen, Student, Soldier: Latina/o Youth, JROTC, and the American Dream.

Rolando Pérez is Professor in the Romance Languages Department at Hunter College. His most recent book is Severo Sarduy and the Neo-Baroque Image of Thought in the Visual Arts.

Gerald E. Poyo is Professor of Latin American and U.S. Latino History at St. Mary’s University in San Antonio. His most recent book is Exile and Revolution: Jose D. Poyo, Key West, and Cuban Independence.

José Quiroga is Professor of Spanish and Comparative Literature at Emory University. His most recent book is Mapa callejero: Crónicas sobre lo gay desde América Latina.

Catherine S. Ramírez is Associate Professor of Latin American and Latino Studies and Director of the Chicano Latino Research Center at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Her current book project is entitled “Assimilation: An Alternative History.”

Ramón H. Rivera-Servera is Associate Professor and Chair in the Department of Performance Studies at Northwestern University. He is the author of Performing Queer Latinidad: Dance, Sexuality, Politics.

Ana Patricia Rodríguez is Associate Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and U.S. Latina/o Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park. She is the author of Dividing the Isthmus: Central American Transnational Histories, Literatures, and Cultures.

Juana María Rodríguez is Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies and Performance Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Her most recent book is Sexual Futures, Queer Gestures, and Other Latina Longings.

Richard T. Rodríguez is Associate Professor of Media and Cultural Studies and English at the University of California, Riverside. He is the author of Next of Kin: The Family in Chicano/a Cultural Politics.

Sandra K. Soto is Associate Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies at the University of Arizona. She is the author of Reading Chican@ Like a Queer: The De- Mastery of Desire.

Alexandra Minna Stern is Professor of American Culture, Obstetrics and Gynecology, History, and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan. Her most recent book is Telling Genes: The Story of Genetic Counseling in America.

Silvio Torres-Saillant is Dean’s Professor of Humanities at Syracuse University. He is the author of An Intellectual History of the Caribbean.

Enid Trucios-Haynes is a Professor of Law at the Louis D. Brandeis School of Law,  Interim Director of the Muhammad Ali Institute for Peace and Justice at the University of Louisville, and Co-Director of the Brandeis Human Rights Advocacy Program.

Angela Valenzuela is a Professor of Educational Administration at the University of Texas at Austin. Her most recent book is an edited collection entitled Growing Critically Conscious Teachers: A Social Justice Curriculum for Educators of Latino/a Youth.

Deborah R. Vargas is Henry Rutgers Term Chair in Comparative Sexuality, Gender, and Race at  Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick. She is the author of Dissonant Divas in Chicana Music: The Limits of La Onda.

Alexandra T. Vazquez is Associate Professor of Performance Studies at New York University. She is the author of Listening in Detail: Performances of Cuban Music.

Patricia Zavella is Professor in the Department of Latin American and Latino Studies at the University  of California, Santa Cruz. Her most recent book is I’m Neither Here Nor There: Mexicans’ Quotidian Struggles with Migration and Poverty.

Ana Celia Zentella is Professor Emerita of the City University of New York and of the University of California, San Diego. She is the author of Growing Up Bilingual: Puerto Rican Children in New York.