Contributors

Marlon M. Bailey is Associate Professor of Women and Gender Studies in the School of Social Transformation at Arizona State University, Tempe. He is the author of Butch Queens Up in Pumps: Gender, Performance, and Ballroom Culture in Detroit (2013), which received the Alan Bray Memorial Book Prize by the GL/Q Caucus from the Modern Language Association in 2014.

Stephanie Leigh Batiste is Associate Professor of Black Studies and English at the University of California at Santa Barbara. She is the author of Darkening Mirrors: Imperial Representation in Depression-­Era African American Performance (2012).

Daphne A. Brooks is Professor of African American Studies and Theater Studies at Yale University. She is the author of two books, Bodies in Dissent: Spectacular Performances of Race and Freedom, 1850–­1910 (2006), and Jeff Buckley’s Grace (2005).

Jayna Brown is Professor of Media Studies at Pratt Institute. She is the author of Babylon Girls: Black Women Performers and the Shaping of the Modern (2008) and Black Utopias: Speculative Life and the Music of Other Worlds (forthcoming).

David Canton is Associate Professor of History and Director of the Africana Studies Program at Connecticut College. He is the author Raymond Pace Alexander: A New Negro Lawyer Fights for Civil Rights in Philadelphia (2010).

Erin D. Chapman is Associate Professor of History at George Washington University. She is the author of Prove It on Me: New Negroes, Sex, and Popular Culture in the 1920s (2012).

Ashon Crawley is Assistant Professor of Religious Studies and African American and African Studies at the University of Virginia. He is the author of Blackpentecostal Breath: The Aesthetics of Possibility (2016).

Erica R. Edwards is Associate Professor of English at Rutgers University, New Brunswick. She is an expert in African American literature and culture and the author of Charisma and the Fictions of Black Leadership (2012).

Daylanne K. English is Professor of English at Macalester College. She is the author of Unnatural Selections: Eugenics in American Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance (2004) and Each Hour Redeem: Time and Justice in African American Literature (2013).

Roderick A. Ferguson is a faculty member in the Department of African American Studies and the Gender and Women’s Studies Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He is the author of One-­Dimensional Queer (2018), We Demand: The University and Student Protests (2017), The Reorder of Things: The University and Its Pedagogies of Minority Difference (2012), and Aberrations in Black: Toward a Queer of Color Critique (2004) and coeditor with Grace Hong of Strange Affinities: The Gender and Sexual Politics of Comparative Racialization (2011).

Michael Boyce Gillespie is Associate Professor of Film at City College of New York, CUNY. He is the author of Film Blackness: American Cinema and the Idea of Black Film (2016).

Lewis R. Gordon is Professor of Philosophy at UCONN-­Storrs, Honorary President and Core Professor at the Global Center for Advanced Studies, and Honorary Professor at the Unit of the Humanities at Rhodes University (UHURU), South Africa. He is the author of many books, including An Introduction to Africana Philosophy (2008) and, more recently, What Fanon Said (2015).

Sarah Haley is Associate Professor of African American Studies and Gender Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. She is the author of No Mercy Here: Gender, Punishment, and the Making of Jim Crow Modernity (2016).

Allyson Hobbs is Associate Professor of American History and Director of African and African American Studies at Stanford University. She is the author of A Chosen Exile: A History of Racial Passing in American Life (2014), which won the Frederick Jackson Turner Award and the Lawrence W. Levine Award presented by the Organization of American Historians.

Habiba Ibrahim is Associate Professor of English at the University of Washington. She is the author of Troubling the Family: The Promise of Personhood and the Rise of Multiracialism (2012).

Shona N. Jackson is Associate Professor of English at Texas A&M University. She is the author of Creole Indigeneity: Between Myth and Nation in the Caribbean (2012).

Tsitsi Jaji is Associate Professor of English and African & African American Studies at Duke University. She is the author of Africa in Stereo: Modernism, Music, and Pan-­African Solidarity (2014) and two volumes of poetry, Beating the Graves (2017) and Carnaval (2014).

Jennifer James is Associate Professor of English and Director of Africana Studies at the George Washington University and author of A Freedom Bought with Blood: African American War Literature, the Civil War–­World War II (20o7).

Régine Michelle Jean-­Charles is Associate Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures and African and African Diaspora Studies at Boston College. She is the author of Conflict Bodies: The Politics of Rape Representation in the Francophone Imaginary (2014).

Hasan Kwame Jeffries is Associate Professor of History at The Ohio State University. He is the author of Bloody Lowndes: Civil Rights and Black Power in Alabama’s Black Belt (2009).

Candice M. Jenkins is Associate Professor of English at the University of Illinois at Urbana-­Champaign. She is the author of Private Lives, Proper Relations: Regulating Black Intimacy (2007), which received the William Sanders Scarborough Prize presented by the Modern Language Association.

Meta DuEwa Jones is Associate Professor in the Department of English at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is the author of The Muse Is Music: Jazz Poetry from the Harlem Renaissance to the Spoken Word (2011), which received honorable mention for the William Sanders Scarborough Prize presented by the Modern Language Association.

Trica Keaton is Associate Professor of African Diaspora Studies at Dartmouth College. She is the author of Muslim Girls and the Other France (2006) and coeditor of Black Europe and the African Diaspora (2009, with Tyler Stovall) and Black France / France Noire: The History and Politics of Blackness (2015, with Darlene Clark Hine and Stephen Small).

Xavier Livermon is Assistant Professor of African and African Diaspora Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. He is author of Performing Freedom: Kwaito and the Politics of Sound in Post-­Apartheid South Africa (forthcoming).

Emily J. Lordi is Associate Professor of English at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and the author of two books: Black Resonance: Iconic Women Singers and African American Literature (2013) and Donny Hathaway Live (2016).

LeRhonda S. Manigault-­Bryant is Associate Professor of Africana Studies at Williams College. She is the author of Talking to the Dead: Religion, Music, and Lived Memory among Gullah/Geechee Women (2014) and coauthor of Womanist and Black Feminist Responses to Tyler Perry’s Productions (2014, with Tamura A. Lomax and Carol B. Duncan).

Charles W. McKinney Jr. is the Neville Frierson Bryan Chair of Africana Studies and Associate Professor of History at Rhodes College. His most recent book (coedited with Aram Goudsouzian) is An Unseen Light: Black Struggles for Freedom in Memphis, Tennessee (2018).

Quincy T. Mills is Associate Professor of History and Director of Africana Studies at Vassar College. He is the author of Cutting along the Color Line: Black Barbers and Barber Shops in America (2013).

Michele Mitchell is Associate Professor of History at New York University. Her most recent book (coedited with Naoko Shibusawa and Stephan F. Miescher) is Gender, Imperialism, and Global Exchanges (2015).

Nick Mitchell is Assistant Professor of Humanities at the University of California at Santa Cruz and is at work on a manuscript titled “Disciplinary Matters: Black Studies, Women’s Studies, and the Neoliberal University.”

Fred Moten is Professor of Performance Studies at New York University. His most recent book is Black and Blur (2017).

Roopali Mukherjee is Associate Professor of Media Studies at the City University of New York, Queens College. She is the author of The Racial Order of Things: Cultural Imaginaries of the Post-­Soul Era (2006) and coeditor of Race Post-­Race: Culture, Critique and the Color Line (forthcoming).

Sowande’ M. Mustakeem is Associate Professor of History and African American Studies at Washington University in St. Louis. She is the author of Slavery at Sea: Terror, Sex, and Sickness in the Middle Passage (2016).

Shayla C. Nunnally is Associate Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies Institute at the University of Connecticut. She is the author of Trust in Black America: Race, Discrimination, and Politics (NYU Press, 2012).

Jeffrey O. G. Ogbar is Professor of History and Founding Director of the Center for the Study of Popular Music at the University of Connecticut. He is the editor or author of multiple books, including Black Power: Radical Politics and African American Identity (2004) and Hip-­Hop Revolution: The Culture and Politics of Rap (2007).

Samantha Pinto is Associate Professor of English and African American Studies at Georgetown University. She is the author of Difficult Diasporas: The Transnational Feminist Aesthetic of the Black Atlantic (NYU Press, 2013), which received the 2013 William Sanders Scarborough Prize from the Modern Language Association.

Eric Porter is Professor of History and History of Consciousness at the University of California at Santa Cruz. His most recent book, coauthored with the photographer Lewis Watts, is New Orleans Suite: Music and Culture in Transition (2013).

Reiland Rabaka is Professor of African, African American, and Caribbean Studies in the Department of Ethnic Studies at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He is the author of more than a dozen books, most recently The Negritude Movement: W. E. B. Du Bois, Leon Damas, Aime Cesaire, Leopold Senghor, Frantz Fanon, and the Evolution of an Insurgent Idea (2015).

Shana L. Redmond is Associate Professor of Musicology and African American Studies at UCLA. She is the author of Anthem: Social Movements and the Sound of Solidarity in the African Diaspora (NYU Press, 2014) and the forthcoming Everything Man: The Form and Function of Paul Robeson.

Dylan Rodríguez is Professor at the University of California, Riverside, and the author of two books: Forced Passages: Imprisoned Radical Intellectuals and the U.S. Prison Regime (2006) and Suspended Apocalypse: White Supremacy, Genocide, and the Filipino Condition (2009).

David Roediger is Foundation Distinguished Professor of American Studies at the University of Kansas. His recent work includes Class, Race, and Marxism (2017) and, with Elizabeth Esch, The Production of Difference (2012).

Damon Chandru Sajnani is Assistant Professor of African Cultural Studies at the University of Wisconsin–­Madison. He is working on a book titled “The African HipHop Movement: Youth Culture and Democracy in Senegal.”

Rashad Shabazz is Associate Professor of Justice and Social Inquiry at Arizona State University. He is the author of Spatializing Blackness: Architectures of Confinement and Black Masculinity in Chicago (2015).

James Smethurst is Professor of Afro-­American Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. His most recent book is titled From Reconstruction to Renaissance: Turn-­of-­Century African American Literature and the Invention of U.S. Modernism (forthcoming).

Riley Snorton is Associate Professor of Africana Studies and Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Cornell University. He is the author of Black on Both Sides: A Racial History of Trans Identity (2017) and Nobody Is Supposed to Know: Black Sexuality on the Down Low (2014).

Damien M. Sojoyner is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Irvine. He is the author of First Strike: Educational Enclosures of Black Los Angeles (2016).

H. Stallings is Professor of Women’s Studies at the University of Maryland–­College Park. She is the author of Mutha Is Half a Word! Intersections of Folklore, Vernacular, Myth, and Queerness in Black Female Culture (2007) and Funk the Erotic: Transaesthetics and Black Sexual Cultures (2015).

Quito Swan is Professor of African Diaspora History at Howard University. He is the author of Black Power in Bermuda: The Struggle for Decolonization (2010).

Lisa B. Thompson is Associate Professor of African and African Diaspora Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. Thomson is the author of Beyond the Black Lady: Sexuality and the New African American Middle Class (2012).

Bryan Wagner is Associate Professor of English at the University of California, Berkeley. His books include Disturbing the Peace: Black Culture and the Police Power after Slavery (2009) and The Tar Baby: A Global History (2017).

Rebecca Wanzo is Associate Professor of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Washington University in St. Louis. She is the author of The Suffering Will Not Be Televised: African American Women and Sentimental Political Storytelling (2009) and various essays in the fields of popular culture, African American literature, critical race theory, and feminist media studies.

Fanon Che Wilkins is Associate Professor of American Studies at Doshisha University. He is the coeditor, with Michael O. West and William G. Martin, of From Toussaint to Tupac: The Black International since the Age of Revolution (2009).

Yohuru Williams is Professor of History and Dean and McQuinn Distinguished Chair of the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota. He is the author, coauthor, and editor of numerous books including Rethinking the Black Freedom Movement (2016) and The Black Panthers: Portraits from an Unfinished Revolution (2016).

Michelle M. Wright is the Augustus Baldwin Longstreet Professor of English at Emory University. She is the author of Becoming Black: Creating Identity in the African Diaspora (2004) and Physics of Blackness: Beyond the Middle Passage Epistemology (2015).