Contributors

Mark Andrejevic is Researcher at Monash University and Professor of Media Studies at Pomona College. He writes about surveillance, popular culture, and digital media.

Melissa Aronczyk is Associate Professor in the School of Communication & Information at Rutgers University. She is the author of Branding the Nation: The Global Business of National Identity and the co-editor of Blowing Up the Brand: Critical Perspectives on Promotional Culture.

Sarah Banet-Weiser is Professor and Director of the School of Communication at  the  Annenberg  School for Communication and  Journalism at the University of Southern California. Her books include Kids Rule! Nickelodeon and Consumer Citizenship, Authentic™: The Politics of Ambivalence in a Brand Culture, Cable Visions: Television Beyond Broadcasting, and Commodity Activism: Cultural Resistance in Neoliberal Times.

Jonathan Bignell is Professor of Television and Film at the University of Reading. His books include two editions of Media Semiotics, three editions of An Introduction to Television Studies, and studies of the history of television in Britain, Europe, and the United States.

Jack Z. Bratich is Associate Professor and Chair of the Journalism and Media Studies Department at Rutgers University. His work applies autonomist social theory to social movement media, audience studies, and the cultural politics of secrecy. He edited a special issue of Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies on Occupy Wall Street.

Jean Burgess (@jeanburgess) is Professor of Digital Media and Director of the Digital Media Research Centre (DMRC) at Queensland University of Technology. Her research focuses on the uses, cultures, and politics of social and mobile media  platforms.

Nico Carpentier is Professor in the Department of Informatics and Media of Uppsala University. In addition, he holds two part-time positions, those of Associate Professor in the Communication Studies Department of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB—Free University of Brussels) and Docent at Charles University in Prague.

Lilie Chouliaraki is Professor of Media and Communications at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Her most recent book is The Ironic Spectator: Solidarity in the Age of Post-humanitarianism (Outstanding Book Award 2015, International Communication Association).

Cynthia Chris is Associate Professor in the Department of Media Culture at the College of Staten Island, City University of New York. She is the author of Watching Wildlife, and co-editor of Cable Visions: Television Beyond Broadcasting and Media Authorship.

John Clarke is Professor Emeritus in the Faculty of Social Sciences at the Open University in the United Kingdom, and is also a Visiting Professor at Central European University in Budapest. He works on transformations of the welfare state, public services, and citizenship.

Nick Couldry is Professor of Media Communications and Social Theory at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He is the author or editor of twelve books including most recently The Mediated Construction of Reality (with Andreas Hepp) and Media Society World.

Amber Day is Associate Professor in the Literary and Cultural Studies Department at Bryant University. She is the author of Satire and Dissent: Interventions in Contemporary Political Debate and editor of the anthology DIY Utopia.

Susan J. Douglas is Catherine Neafie Kellogg Professor of Communication Studies at the University of Michigan. She is the author, most recently, of The Rise of Enlightened Sexism: How Pop Culture Took Us from Girl Power to Girls Gone Wild and of Where the Girls Are: Growing Up Female with the Mass Media.

Stephen Duncombe is Professor of Media and Culture at New York University. He is the author or editor of six books, and writes and speaks regularly on the intersection of culture and politics. He is also a lifelong political activist, and is presently co-founder and codirector of the Center for Artistic Activism.

Elizabeth Ellcessor is Assistant Professor in the Media School at Indiana University Bloomington. She is the author of Restricted Access: Media, Disability, and the Politics of Participation.

Terry Flew is Professor of Media and Communications at the Queensland University of Technology, with research interests in digital media, global media, media policy, and media economics. He is the author of eight books, and has headed major public enquiries into Australian media law and policy.

Kelly Gates is Associate Professor of Communication and Science Studies at the University of California, San Diego. She is the author of Our Biometric Future: Facial Recognition Technology and the Culture of Surveillance. Her work examines surveillance and visual media through the combined lenses of cultural studies and science and technology studies.

Myria Georgiou is Associate Professor in the Department of Media and Communications, London School of Economics and Political Science. She is the author of Diaspora, Identity and the Media and of Media and the City.

Rosalind Gill is Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis at City University London. She is the author or editor of several books, including Gender and the Media, New Femininities: Postfeminism, Neoliberalism and Subjectivity, and Mediated Intimacy: Sex Advice in Media Culture. Her latest collection (with Ana Sofia Elias and Christina Scharff) is Aesthetic Labour: Rethinking Beauty Politics in Neoliberalism.

Lisa Gitelman is Professor of English and Media Studies at New York University. She is the author most recently of Paper Knowledge.

Herman Gray is Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Santa Cruz and has published widely in the areas of black cultural politics and media. His books include Producing Jazz, Watching Race, Cultural Moves, and, most recently, Towards a Sociology of the Trace, co-edited with Macarena Gómez-Barris. His current research considers diversity, difference, and the cultural politics of media visibility.

Jonathan Gray is Professor of Media and Cultural Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He is the author of Television Entertainment, Television Studies (with Amanda D. Lotz), Show Sold Separately: Promos, Spoilers, and Other Media Paratexts, and Watching with The Simpsons: Television, Parody, and Intertextuality, and co-editor of numerous other collections.

Melissa Gregg is a researcher at Intel Corporation studying the future of work. She is the author of Work’s Intimacy and Cultural Studies’ Affective Voices, and coeditor of The Affect Theory Reader.

Laura Grindstaff is Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Davis with affiliations in Cultural Studies, Gender Studies, and Performance Studies. An ethnographer by training, she specializes in the study of American popular culture and has published widely on topics ranging from cheerleading to reality television.

Mary Beth Haralovich is Professor in the School of Theatre, Film, and Television, University of Arizona, Tucson. Her social history of the 1950s suburban family domestic comedy has been reprinted many times. She is a founder of the international conference Console-ing Passions.

Alison Hearn is Associate Professor in the Faculty of Information and Media Studies at the University of Western Ontario. She has published widely in such journals as Continuum, Journal of Consumer Culture, and Journal of Communication Inquiry and in edited volumes including The Media and Social Theory and Blowing Up the Brand.

Lisa Henderson is Professor of Communication at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Her most recent book is Love and Money: Queers, Class and Cultural Production, and her current work is on collaboration between scholars and artists.

Matt Hills is Professor of Media and Journalism at the University of Huddersfield. He is the author of six books, from Fan Cultures through to Doctor Who: The Unfolding Event.

Michele Hilmes is Professor Emerita at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Her books include Radio Voices: American Broadcasting 19221952, Only Connect: A Cultural History of Broadcasting in the United States, and, most recently, Radio’s New Wave: Global Sound in the Digital Era.

Jennifer Holt is Associate Professor of Film and Media Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is the author of Empires of Entertainment and coeditor of Distribution Revolution, Connected Viewing, and Media Industries: History, Theory, Method.

Henry Jenkins is Provost’s Professor of Communication, Journalism, Cinematic Arts, and Education at the University of Southern California. He is the author of seventeen books, including Textual Poachers: Television Fans and Participatory Culture and By Any Media Necessary: The New Youth Activism.

Derek Johnson is Associate Professor of Media and Cultural Studies in the Department of Communication Arts at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He is the author of Media Franchising: Creative License and Collaboration in the Culture Industries.

Derek Kompare is Associate Professor of Film and Media Arts in the Meadows School of the Arts at Southern Methodist University. He is the author of Rerun Nation, CSI, and several articles on television form and history.

Marwan M. Kraidy is Anthony Shadid Chair in Global Media, Politics and Culture at the University of Pennsylvania. His most recent book is The Naked Blogger of Cairo: Creative Insurgency in the Arab World.

Tama Leaver is Senior Lecturer in Internet Studies at Curtin University in Western Australia. His books include Artificial Culture: Identity, Technology and Bodies and Social, Casual and Mobile Games: The Changing Gaming Landscape.

Suzanne Leonard is Associate Professor of English at Simmons College, and the author of Fatal Attraction and co-editor of Fifty Hollywood Directors. Her monograph Wife, Inc.: The Business of Marriage in Twenty-First Century American Culture is forthcoming.

Marina Levina is Associate Professor of Communication at the University of Memphis. She is the author of Pandemics and the Media.

Elana Levine is Associate Professor in the Department of Journalism, Advertising, and Media Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee. She is the author of Wallowing in Sex: The New Sexual Culture of 1970American Television and co-author of Legitimating Television: Media Convergence and Cultural Status.

Justin Lewis is Professor of Communication at Cardiff University. His most recent book is Beyond Consumer Capitalism: Media and the Limits to Imagination.

George Lipsitz is Professor of Black Studies and Sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His publications include Time Passages, Dangerous Crossroads, and Midnight at the Barrelhouse. He is senior editor of the ethnic studies journal Kalfou.

Jo Littler is Reader in Cultural Industries in the Department of Sociology, City University London. She is the author of Radical Consumption? Shopping for Change in Contemporary Culture and is currently finishing a book called Against Meritocracy: Culture, Power and Myths of Mobility.

Amanda D. Lotz is Professor of Media Studies at the University of Michigan. She is the author of The Television Will Be Revolutionized, Cable Guys: Television and Masculinities in the 21st Century, and Redesigning Women: Television after the Network Era.

Lev Manovich is the author or editor of eight books, including Software Takes Command, Soft Cinema: Navigating the Database, and The Language of New Media, which was described as “the most suggestive and broad ranging media history since Marshall McLuhan.”

Vicki Mayer is Professor of Communication at Tulane University, coeditor of the journal Television & New Media, and author or editor of several books and journal articles about media production, creative industries, and cultural work.

Kembrew McLeod is Professor of Communication Studies at the University of Iowa. He has published and produced several books and documentaries about music and popular culture. His book Freedom of Expression® received an ALA book award, and his most recent documentary Copyright Criminals aired on PBS.

Jason Mittell is Professor of Film and Media Culture and American Studies at Middlebury College. His books include Genre and Television: From Cop Shows to Cartoons in American Culture, Television and American Culture, and Complex Television: The Poetics of Contemporary Television Storytelling.

Helen Morgan Parmett is Assistant Professor in Communication Studies at Western Washington University. Her research focuses on media’s role in the production of space, addressing issues of identity, branding, cultural policy, and governance.

Dawn Nafus is an anthropologist at Intel Labs. She holds a PhD from the University of Cambridge. Her research interests include experiences of time, beliefs about technology and modernity, and the anthropology of numeracies. She is interested in exploring new ways people might relate to their own data.

Diane Negra is Professor of Film Studies and Screen Culture and Head of Film Studies at University College Dublin. A member of the Royal Irish Academy, she is the author, editor, or co-editor of ten books and the coeditor of Television & New Media.

Michael Z. Newman is Associate Professor in the Department of Journalism, Advertising, and Media Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee. He is the author of Indie: An American Film Culture and Video Revolutions: On the History of a Medium and the co-author of Legitimating Television: Media Convergence and Cultural Status.

Laurie Ouellette is Associate Professor at the University of Minnesota, where she teaches Media Studies and Cultural Sudies. She is the editor of The Media Studies Reader, co-author of Better Living through Reality TV: Television and Post-Welfare Citizenship, and author of Lifestyle TV.

Lisa Parks is Professor of Film and Media Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and author of Cultures in Orbit: Satellites and the Televisual and co-editor of Signal Traffic: Critical Studies of Media Infrastructures, Down to Earth: Satellite Technologies, Industries and Cultures, and Life in the Age of Drones.

Matthew Thomas Payne is Assistant Professor of Film, Television, and Theater at the University of Notre Dame. He is the author of Playing War: Military Video Games after 9/11 and co-editor of the anthologies Flow TV and Joystick Soldiers.

Jennifer Petersen is Associate Professor of Media Studies at the University of Virginia. She is the author of Murder, the Media, and the Politics of Public Feelings and is currently working on a history of how new communication technologies have shaped the understanding of speech within First Amendment law.

Aswin Punathambekar is Associate Professor of Communication Studies and Founding Director of the Global Media Studies Initiative at the University of Michigan. He is the author of From Bombay to Bollywood: The Making of a Global Media Industry.

Carrie A. Rentschler is Associate Professor and William Dawson Scholar of Feminist Media Studies in the Department of Art History and Communication Studies at McGill University. She is the author of Second Wounds: Victims’ Rights and the Media in the US and co-editor of Girlhood Studies and the Politics of Place.

Ellen Seiter holds the Nenno Endowed Chair in Television Studies at the University of Southern California School of Cinematic Arts. Some of her books include The Internet Playground and The Creative Artist’s Legal Guide (with co-author Bill Seiter).

Sarah Sharma is Associate Professor and Director of the McLuhan Program in Culture and Technology at the University of Toronto. She is a faculty member at the Institute of Communication, Culture, Information and Technology (Mississauga) and the Faculty of Information (St. George).

Jennifer Daryl Slack is Professor of Communication and Cultural Studies in the Department of Humanities at Michigan Technological University. Her recent books include the second edition of Culture and Technology: A Primer, with J. Macgregor Wise, and Cultural Studies: 1983 by Stuart Hall, edited with Lawrence Grossberg.

Greg M. Smith is Professor of Moving Image Studies at Georgia State University. His books include What Media Classes Really Want to Discuss and Beautiful TV: The Art and Argument of Ally McBeal.

Beretta E. Smith-Shomade is Associate Professor at Emory University. Her publications include Shaded Lives: African-American Women and Television, Pimpin’ Ain’t Easy: Selling Black Entertainment Television, and the anthology Watching while Black: Centering the Television of Black Audiences.

Karen Tongson is Associate Professor of English and Gender Studies at the University of Southern California, and author of Relocations: Queer Suburban Imaginaries. She is series editor for Postmillennial Pop at New York University Press, and has two books in progress: Normal Television: Critical Essays on Queer Spectatorship after the “New Normalcy” and Empty Orchestra: Karaoke in Our Time.

Graeme Turner is Emeritus Professor of Cultural Studies in the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities at the University of Queensland. His most recent publications include Television Histories in Asia (with Jinna Tay) and Re-Inventing the Media.

Joseph Turow is Robert Lewis Shayon Professor of Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication. His most recent book is The Aisles Have Eyes: How Retailers Track Your Shopping, Strip Your Privacy, and Define Your Power.

Angharad N. Valdivia—Research Professor in the Institute of Communications Research at the University of Illinois—was Inaugural Head of Media and Cinema Studies and Interim Director of the Institute of Communications Research, 2009 to 2014. She publishes on Latina/o studies, media studies, girls studies, transnationalism, gender, and popular culture.

Brenda R. Weber is Professor and Chair of the Department of Gender Studies and Professor in Cinema and Media Studies in the Media School at Indiana University Bloomington. Her most recent book is Reality Gendervision: Sexuality and Gender on Transatlantic Reality TV.

Michele White is Professor of Internet Studies in Tulane University’s Department of Communication. Her monographs consist of The Body and the Screen: Theories of Internet Spectatorship, Buy It Now: Lessons from eBay, and Producing Women: The Internet, Traditional Femininity, Queerness, and Creativity.

Macgregor Wise is Professor of Communication Studies at Arizona State University, where he writes and teaches about cultural studies of technology, globalization, surveillance, and popular culture.