Contributors

Rick Bonus is Associate Professor of American Ethnic Studies at the University of Washington, Seattle. He co-­edited (with Linda Trinh Võ) Contemporary Asian American Communities: Intersections and Divergences (2002) and is author of Locating Filipino Americans: Ethnicity and the Cultural Politics of Space (2000).

Lucy Mae San Pablo Burns is Associate Professor of Asian American Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. She is the author of Puro Arte: Filipinos on the Stages of Empire (NYU Press, 2012).

Sucheng Chan is Professor Emerita of Asian American Studies and Global Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is author of In Defense of Asian American Studies: The Politics of Teaching and Program Building (2005), Asian Americans: An Interpretive History (1991), Survivors: Cambodian Refugees in the United States (2004), and This Bittersweet Soil: The Chinese in California Agriculture, 1860–1910 (1989). She also edited The Vietnamese American 1.5 Generation: Stories of War, Revolution, Flight and New Beginnings (2006), Chinese American Transnationalism: The Flow of People, Resources and Ideas between China and America during the Exclusion Era (2005), Hmong Means Free: Life in Laos and America (1994), Quiet Odyssey: A Pioneer Korean Woman in America (1990), and several other books.

Kornel Chang is Associate Professor of History and American Studies at Rutgers University, Newark. He is author of Pacific Connections: The Making of the U.S.-­Canadian Borderlands (2012).

Yoonmee Chang is Associate Professor of English at George Mason University. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania and is the author of Writing the Ghetto: Class, Authorship, and the Asian American Enclave (2010). Chang’s current research focuses on North Korea and disability studies; she also writes poetry.

Sylvia Shin Huey Chong is Director of the Asian Pacific American Studies minor and Associate Professor of English and American Studies at the University of Virginia. Her most recent book is The Oriental Obscene: Violence and Racial Fantasies in the Vietnam Era (2012).

Catherine Ceniza Choy is Professor of Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of Empire of Care: Nursing and Migration in Filipino American History (2003) and Global Families: A History of Asian International Adoption in America (NYU Press, 2013).

Monisha Das Gupta is Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies and Women’s Studies at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. She is the author of Unruly Immigrants: Rights, Activism, and Transnational South Asian Politics in the United States (2006), which won awards in 2008 from the Association of Asian American Studies and the American Sociological Association’s section on Asia and Asian America.

Shilpa Davé is Assistant Professor of Media Studies and American Studies at the University of Virginia. She is the author of Indian Accents: Brown Voice and Racial Performance in American Television and Film (2013) and co-editor (with Leilani Nishime and Tasha G. Oren) of the collection East Main Street: Asian American Popular Culture (NYU Press, 2005).

Jigna Desai is Professor in the Department of Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies and the Program of Asian American Studies at the University of Minnesota.  She is the author of Beyond Bollywood: The Cultural Politics of South Asian Diasporic Film (2004) and co-­editor of Bollywood: A Reader (2009), Transnational Feminism and Global Advocacy in South Asia (2012), and Asian Americans in Dixie: Race and Migration in the South (2013).

Pawan Dhingra is Chair and Professor of Sociology and American Studies at Tufts University. He co-curated the Smithsonian Institution exhibition Beyond Bollywood (2014). He also has authored two award-winning monographs: Managing Multicultural Lives: Asian American Professionals and the Challenge of Multiple Identities (2007) and Life behind the Lobby: Indian American Motel Owners and the American Dream (2012). He recently co-authored Asian America: Sociological and Interdisciplinary Perspectives (2014).

Lan P. Duong is Associate Professor in the Media and Cultural Studies Department at the University of California, Riverside. She is author of Treacherous Subjects: Gender, Culture, and Trans-Vietnamese Feminism (2012).

Yê´n Lê Espiritu is Professor of Ethnic Studies at the University of California, San Diego. She has published widely on Asian American panethnicity, gender, and migration, and U.S. colonialism and wars in Asia. Her most recent book is Body Counts: The Vietnam War and Militarized Refuge(es) (2014).

Evelyn Nakano Glenn is Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies and Ethnic Studies and Founding Director of the Center for Race and Gender at the University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of Issei, Nisei, War Bride: Three Generations of Japanese American Women in Domestic Service (1988), Unequal Freedom: How Race and Gender Shaped American Citizen and Labor (2004), and Forced to Care: Coercion and Caregiving in America (2012); she is also editor of Mothering: Ideology, Experience and Agency (1993) and Shades of Difference: Why Skin Color Matters (2009).

Vernadette Vicuña Gonzalez is Associate Professor of American Studies at the University of Hawai‘i, Mānoa. She is author of Securing Paradise: Tourism and Militarism in Hawai‘i and the Philippines (2013).

Neil Gotanda is Professor of Law at Western State College of Law in Fullerton, California. He has published in numerous law journals and co-edited (with Kimberlé Crenshaw, Gary Peller, and Kendall Thomas) Critical Race Theory: Key Writings That Formed the Movement (1995).

Robert T. Hayashi is Associate Professor and Chair of American Studies at Amherst College. He is author of Haunted by Waters: A Journey through Race and Place in the American West (2007) and is currently writing a book that explores the intersections of sports, race, and class in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Bill Ong Hing is Professor of Law at the University of San Francisco School of Law. He has authored Ethical Borders: NAFTA, Globalization, and Mexican Migration (2010), Deporting Our Souls: Morality, Values, and Immigration Policy (2005), Defining America through Immigration Policy (2004), To Be an American: Cultural Pluralism and the Rhetoric of Assimilation (NYU Press, 1997), and Making and Remaking Asian America through Immigration Policy (1993).

Lane Ryo Hirabayashi is Professor of Asian American Studies, and holds the George and Sakaye Aratani Endowed Chair at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is co-author of A Principled Stand: The Story of Hirabayashi v. United States (2013), and the author of Japanese American Resettlement through the Lens: Hikaru Carl Iwasaki and the WRA’s Photographic Section (2009), among other books. Lane has also written a series of articles with Marilyn Alquizola on the Filipino writer and activist Carlos Bulosan, including “Carlos Bulosan’s Final Defiant Acts” in Amerasia Journal (2012), as well as a new introduction to the reissue of Bulosan’s classic book America Is in the Heart (2014).

Jennifer Ho is Associate Professor in the Department of English & Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She is author of Racial Ambiguity in Asian American Culture (forthcoming 2015).

Evelyn Hu-DeHart is Professor of History and American Studies and the Director of Ethnic Studies at Brown University. She has authored Missionaries, Miners, and Indians: History of Spanish Contact with the Yaqui Indians of Northwestern Spain, 1533–1830 (1981) and Yaqui Resistance and Survival: Struggle for Land and Autonomy, 1821–1910 (1984). She edited Across the Pacific: Asian Americans and Globalization (1999) and (with Khun Eng Kuah-Pearce) Voluntary Associations in the Chinese Diaspora (2006).

Shirley Hune is Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies at the University of Washington, Seattle, and Professor Emerita of Urban Planning, UCLA. She has published extensively in the areas of Asian American historiography and critical race, women’s, and gender studies, and on the challenges experienced by Asian American and Pacific Islander students, faculty, and administrators in higher education.

Allan Punzalan Isaac is Associate Professor of American Studies and English at Rutgers University–New Brunswick. His book, American Tropics: Articulating Filipino America (2006), was the recipient of the Association for Asian American Studies Cultural Studies Book Award.

Helen Heran Jun is Associate Professor in the English Department and the African American Studies Department at the University of Illinois, Chicago. She is author of Race for Citizenship: Black Orientalism and Asian Uplift from Pre-Emancipation to Neoliberal America (NYU Press, 2011).

Moon-Ho Jung is Associate Professor and the Walker Family Endowed Professor of History at the University of Washington, Seattle. He is author of Coolies and Cane: Race, Labor, and Sugar in the Age of Emancipation (2006) and editor of The Rising Tide of Color: Race, State Violence, and Radical Movements across the Pacific (2014). His current project is The Unruly Pacific: Race and the Politics of Empire and Revolution, 1898–1941 (forthcoming).

David Kyuman Kim is Associate Professor of Religious Studies and American Studies at Connecticut College, where he also served as the Inaugural Director of the Center for the Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity. He is author of Melancholic Freedom: Agency and the Spirit of Politics (2007) and co-editor of The Post-Secular in Question (NYU Press, 2012), and co-edits the book series RaceReligion.

Richard S. Kim is Chair and Associate Professor in the Department of Asian American Studies at the University of California, Davis. He is the author of The Quest for Statehood: Korean Immigrant Nationalism and U.S. Sovereignty, 1905–1945 (2011).

Rebecca Chiyoko King-O’Riain is Senior Lecturer of Sociology at National University of Ireland Maynooth. Her most recent book is Global Mixed Race (NYU Press, 2014).

Robert Ji-Song Ku is Associate Professor of Asian American Studies at Binghamton University of the State University of New York. He is the author of Dubious Gastronomy: The Cultural Politics of Eating Asian in the USA (2014) and co-editor of Eating Asian America: A Food Studies Reader (NYU Press, 2013).

James Kyung-Jin Lee is Associate Professor and Chair of Asian American Studies at the University of California, Irvine. A former associate editor of American Quarterly, he is author of Urban Triage: Race and Fictions of Multiculturalism (2004).

Josephine Lee is Professor of English and Asian American Studies at the University of Minnesota. She is author of The Japan of Pure Invention: Gilbert and Sullivan’s The Mikado (2010) and Performing Asian America: Race and Ethnicity on the Contemporary Stage (1997). She has co-edited (with R. A. Shiomi and Don Eitel) Asian American Plays for a New Generation (2011) and (with Imogene Lim and Yuko Matsukawa) Re/collecting Early Asian America: Essays in Cultural History (2002).

Robert G. Lee is Associate Professor of American Studies at Brown University. He edited Dear Miye, Letters Home from Japan 1939–1946 (1995), which received the 1996 Special Book Award from the Association for Asian American Studies. He is author of Orientals: Asian Americans in Popular Culture (1999), which received awards from the Northeast Popular Culture/American Culture Association, the American Political Science Association, and the American Studies Association.

Shelley Sang-Hee Lee is Associate Professor of Comparative American Studies and History at Oberlin College. She is author of Claiming the Oriental Gateway: Seattle and Japanese America, 1900–1942 (2011) and A New History of Asian America (2013).

Karen Leong is Associate Professor of Women and Gender Studies and Asian Pacific American Studies in the School of Social Transformation at Arizona State University. She is the author of The China Mystique: Pearl S. Buck, Anna May Wong, Mayling Soong Chiang and the Transformation of American Orientalism (2005).

Nhi T. Lieu is an independent scholar and author of The American Dream in Vietnamese (2011). Her published works have appeared in Alien Encounters: Popular Culture in Asian America, Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies, and Journal of Asian American Studies.

Andrea Louie is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Michigan State University and is also the Director of the institution’s Asian Pacific American Studies program. She is author of Chineseness across Borders: Renegotiating Chinese Identities in China and the United States (2004), which won the Social Science Book Award from the Association for Asian American Studies. Her most recent book is How Chinese Are You? Adopted Chinese Youth and Their Families Negotiate Identity and Culture (forthcoming 2015).

Margo Machida is Professor of Art History and Asian American Studies at the University of Connecticut. Her most recent monograph is Unsettled Visions: Contemporary Asian American Artists and the Social Imaginary (2009), which was the recipient of the Cultural Studies Book Award from the Association for Asian American Studies. She also co-authored (with Elaine H. Kim and Sharon Mizota) Fresh Talk/Daring Gazes: Conversations on Asian American Art (2005).

Daryl Joji Maeda is Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He is the author of Rethinking the Asian American Movement (2012) and Chains of Babylon: The Rise of Asian America (2009).

Martin F. Manalansan IV is Associate Professor of Asian American Studies and Anthropology at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He is author of Global Divas: Filipino Gay Men in the Diaspora (2003). He has edited the following collections: (with Robert Ku and Anita Mannur) Eating Asian America: A Food Studies Reader (NYU Press, 2013), (with Arnaldo Cruz-Malave) Queer Globalizations: Citizenship and the Afterlife of Colonialism (NYU Press, 2002), and Cultural Compass: Ethnographic Explorations of Asian America (2000).

Anita Mannur is Associate Professor of English and Asian/Asian American Studies at Miami University. She is author of Culinary Fictions: Food in South Asian Diasporic Culture (2010) and co-edited (with Martin Manalansan and Robert Ku) Eating Asian America: A Food Studies Reader (NYU Press, 2013) and (with Jana Evans) Theorizing Diaspora: A Reader (2003).

Mari Matsuda is Professor of Law in the William S. Richardson School of Law at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa. She is co-author (with Charles Lawrence) of We Won’t Go Back: Making the Case for Affirmative Action (1997) and Words That Wound: Critical Race Theory, Assaultive Speech, and the First Amendment (1993). She is also author of Where Is Your Body?: Essays on Race, Gender, and the Law (1996) and edited Called from Within: Early Women Lawyers of Hawai‘i (1992).

Viet Thanh Nguyen is Associate Professor of English and American Studies and Ethnicity at the University of Southern California. He is author of Race and Resistance: Literature and Politics in Asian America (2002) and the novel The Sympathizer (forthcoming 2015).

Crystal Parikh is Associate Professor of English and Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University. Her monograph, An Ethics of Betrayal: The Politics of Otherness in Emergent U.S. Literature and Culture (2009), received the MLA Prize in United States Latina and Latino and Chicana and Chicano Literary and Cultural Studies.

Edward J. W. Park is a Professor in the Asian Pacific American Studies Program at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. He co-authored (with John S. W. Park) Probationary Americans: Contemporary Immigration Policies and the Shaping of Asian American Communities (2005).

John S. W. Park is Chair and Professor of Asian American Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and he serves as the Associate Director for the UC Center for New Racial Studies. He is the co-author (with Edward J. W. Park) of Probationary Americans (2005), and his two other books are Elusive Citizenship (NYU Press, 2004) and Illegal Migrations and the Huckleberry Finn Problem (2013).

Lisa Sun-Hee Park is Professor of Sociology and Asian American Studies at the University of Minnesota. She has authored Entitled to Nothing: The Struggle for Immigrant Health Care in the Age of Welfare Reform (NYU Press, 2011) and Consuming Citizenship: Children of Asian Immigrant Entrepreneurs (2005), which was awarded the American Sociological Association’s Outstanding Book Award (Asia and Asian America Section) in 2006. She also co-authored two books with David Naguib Pellow: The Slums of Aspen: Immigrants vs. the Environment in America’s Eden (NYU Press, 2011) and The Silicon Valley of Dreams: Immigrant Labor, Environmental Injustice, and the High Tech Global Economy (NYU Press, 2002).

Martin Joseph Ponce is Associate Professor of English at The Ohio State University. He is the author of Beyond the Nation: Diasporic Filipino Literature and Queer Reading (NYU Press 2012).

Junaid Rana is Associate Professor of Asian American Studies at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He is the author of Terrifying Muslims: Race and Labor in the South Asian Diaspora (2011).

Greg Robinson is Professor of History at l’Université du Québec à Montréal and author of By Order of the President: FDR and the Internment of Japanese Americans (2001), A Tragedy of Democracy: Japanese Confinement in North America (2009), which was the recipient of the 2009 History Book Prize of the Association for Asian American Studies, and After Camp: Portraits in Midcentury Japanese American Life and Politics (2012), which won the 2013 Caroline Bancroft History Prize. He also edited Pacific Citizens: Larry and Guyo Tajiri and Japanese America Journalism in the World War II Era (2012).

Robyn Magalit Rodriguez is Associate Professor of Asian American Studies at the University of California, Davis. She is author of Migrants for Export: How the Philippine State Brokers Labor to the World (2010) and co-author, with Pawan Dhingra, of Asian America: Sociological and Interdisciplinary Perspectives (2014).

Cathy J. Schlund-Vials is Associate Professor in English and Asian/Asian American Studies at the University of Connecticut (Storrs). She is currently the Director for the UConn Asian American Studies Institute and is the author of two monographs: Modeling Citizenship: Jewish and Asian American Writing (2011) and War, Genocide, and Justice: Cambodian American Memory Work (2012). She is also a series editor (with David Palumbo-Liu, Linda Trinh Võ, and K. Scott Wong) for Temple University Press’s Asian American History and Culture series.

Nitasha Tamar Sharma is Associate Professor of African American Studies and Asian American Studies at Northwestern University. She is author of Hip Hop Desis: South Asian Americans, Blackness and Global Race Consciousness (2010).

Min Hyoung Song is Professor of English at Boston College and the former editor of the Journal of Asian American Studies. He is the author of Strange Future: Pessimism and the 1992 Los Angeles Riots (2005) and The Children of 1965: On Writing, and Not Writing, as an Asian American (2013). He also co-edited (with Jean Wu) Asian American Studies: A Reader (2000), and is co-editing (with Rajini Srikanth) The Cambridge History of Asian American Literature.

Rajini Srikanth is Professor of English, affiliated faculty in the Asian American Studies Program, and Dean of the Honors College at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. She has authored two monographs, Constructing the Enemy: Empathy/Antipathy in U.S. Literature and Law (2012) and The World Next Door: South Asian American Literature and the Idea of America (2004), and co-edited several collections, including White Women in Racialized Spaces: Imaginative Transformation and Ethical Action in Literature (2002).

Khatharya Um is Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies and Chair of Peace and Conflict Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. She is co-editor of Southeast Asian Migration: People on the Move in Search of Work, Marriage and Refuge (forthcoming 2015), author of From the Land of Shadows (forthcoming 2015), and has published articles in Positions, Southeast Asian Affairs, Refuge, and Amerasia Journal.

Linda Trinh Võ is Associate Professor in the Department of Asian American Studies at the University of California, Irvine. She is the author of Mobilizing an Asian American Community (2004) and co-editor of Contemporary Asian American Communities: Intersection and Divergences (2002), Asian American Women: The “Frontiers” Reader (2004), and Labor versus Empire: Race, Gender, and Migration (2004). She is a series editor for the Asian American History and Culture series published by Temple University Press and is president of the Association for Asian American Studies.

Janelle Wong is Associate Professor of Political Science and Asian American Studies at the University of Maryland, where she also serves as the Director of the Asian American Studies Program. She is author of Democracy’s Promise: Immigrants and American Civic Institutions (2006) and co-authored (with S. Karthick Ramakrishnan, Taeku Lee, and Jane Junn) Asian American Political Participation: Emerging Constituents and Identities (2011) and (with Pei-te Lien and M. Margaret Conway) The Politics of Asia America: Diversity and Community (2004).

K. Scott Wong is James Phinney Baxter III Professor of History and Public Affairs at Williams College, where he teaches a variety of courses in Asian American history, comparative immigration history, history and memory, and the history of race and ethnicity in American culture. In addition to numerous articles in journals and anthologies, he co-edited, with Sucheng Chan, Claiming America: Constructing Chinese American Identities during the Exclusion Era (1998), and he is the author of “Americans First”: Chinese Americans and the Second World War (2005). He is a series editor for the Asian American History and Culture series published by Temple University Press.

Cynthia Wu is Assistant Professor of American Studies at the State University of New York, Buffalo. She is author of Chang and Eng Reconnected: The Original Siamese Twins in American Culture (2012).

Judy Tzu-Chun Wu is Professor of Asian American Studies at the University of California, Irvine. She is the author of Dr. Mom Chung of the Fair-Haired Bastards: The Life of a Wartime Celebrity (2005) and Radicals on the Road: Internationalism, Orientalism, and Feminism during the Vietnam Era (2013). She is also the co-editor of Frontiers: A Journal of Women’s Studies and Women’s America: Refocusing the Past, 8th Edition (forthcoming 2015).

Grace J. Yoo is Professor and Chair of Asian American Studies at San Francisco State University. She recently co-authored (with Barbara Kim) Caring across Generations: The Linked Lives of Korean American Families (NYU Press, 2014), co-edited (with Mai-Nhung Le and Alan Oda) Handbook of Asian American Health (2013), and edited Koreans in America: History, Identity and Community (2012). She also co-edited (with Edith Chen) Encyclopedia of Asian American Issues Today (2010).