Contributors

Vermonja R. Alston is Associate Professor in the Departments of English and Humanities at York University. She has completed a manuscript titled “From Cosmopolitan Fantasies to Kinesthetic Empathy: Dancing Towards an Embodied Cosmopolitanism.” Her current work is at the intersection of poetics and visual culture, memory studies and museum studies.

Lauren Berlant is George M. Pullman Distinguished Professor of English at the University of Chicago. Her work on citizenship includes The Anatomy of National Fantasy, The Queen of America Goes to Washington City, The Female Complaint, and Cruel Optimism. Her most recent book is, with Lee Edelman, Sex, or the Unbearable.

Marc Bousquet is Associate Professor of English at Emory University. He is the author of How the University Works: Higher Education and the Low-Wage Nation.

Mary Pat Brady is Associate Professor in the Department of English and Director of the Latino Studies Program at Cornell University. She is the author of Extinct Lands, Temporal Geographies: Chicana Literature and the Urgency of Space.

Laura Briggs is Professor and Chair of the Women, Gender, Sexuality Studies Department at the University of Massachusetts–Amherst. Her most recent book is Somebody’s Children: The Politics of Transracial and Transnational Adoption.

Bruce Burgett is Dean and Professor in the School of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences at the University of Washington, Bothell, graduate faculty in the Department of English at the University of Washington, Seattle, and Codirector of the UW graduate Certificate in Public Scholarship. He is the author of Sentimental Bodies: Sex, Gender, and Citizenship in the Early Republic.

Christopher Castiglia is Professor of English at Pennsylvania State University, the author of Bound and Determined: Captivity Culture-Crossing and White Womanhood from Mary Rowlandson to Patty Hearst, Interior States: Institutional Consciousness and the Inner Life of Democracy, and (with Chris Reed) If Memory Serves: Gay Men, AIDS, and the Promise of the Queer Past.

Russ Castronovo is Dorothy Draheim Professor of English and American Studies at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He is author of several books, most recently Propaganda 1776: Secrets, Leaks, and Revolutionary Communications.

Eva Cherniavsky is Andrew R. Hilen Professor of American Literature and Culture at the University of Washington. She is completing a book titled Neocitizenship: Political Culture after Popular Sovereignty.

Kandice Chuh is a Professor in the PhD program in English at the CUNY Graduate Center, where she is also affiliated with the Mellon Committee on Globalization and Social Change and the American Studies program. Her current research brings together aesthetic philosophies and theories, minority discourse, and analysis of globalization’s impact on modern sociopolitical subjectivity.

Krista Comer is Associate Professor of English and Associate Director of the Center for the Study of Women, Gender & Sexuality at Rice University. Her most recent book is Surfer Girls in the New World Order.

Ann Cvetkovich is Ellen Clayton Garwood Centennial Professor of English and Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. Her most recent book is Depression: A Public Feeling.

Micaela di Leonardo is Professor of Anthropology and Performance Studies at Northwestern University. She is the author of Exotics at Home: Anthropologies, Others, American Modernity and the author or editor of four other books. She is finishing a historical ethnographic study of New Haven, Connecticut, and writing a book on contemporary black American radio and progressive politics.

Lisa Duggan is Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University and the author most recently of Twilight of Equality? Neoliberalism, Cultural Politics, and the Attack on Democracy.

Brent Hayes Edwards is Professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University and the author of The Practice of Diaspora, among other works. His current book projects include a cultural history of the “loft jazz” scene in downtown Manhattan in the 1970s and a translation of Michel Leiris’s anthropological classic L’Afrique fantôme.

Brian T. Edwards is Associate Professor of English, Comparative Literary Studies, and American Studies at Northwestern University, where he is also Director of the Program in Middle East and North African Studies. He is the author of Morocco Bound: Disorienting America’s Maghreb, from Casablanca to the Marrakech Express and coeditor, with Dilip Gaonkar, of Globalizing American Studies. He is completing a book called After the American Century: Ends of Circulation in Cairo, Casablanca, and Tehran.

Robert Fanuzzi is Associate Professor of English and Director of the American Studies program at St. John’s University. He is the author of Abolition’s Public Sphere and is completing a book project titled “Foreign Counterparts: French Colonial Racial Politics and Democracy in America.”

Roderick A. Ferguson is Professor of Race and Critical Theory in the Department of American Studies at the University of Minnesota. He is coeditor with Grace Hong of Strange Affinities: The Gender and Sexual Politics of Comparative Racialization and the author of Aberrations in Black: Toward a Queer of Color Critique and The Reorder of Things: The University and Its Pedagogies of Minority Difference.

Shelley Fisher Fishkin is the Joseph S. Atha Professor of Humanities, Professor of English, and Director of American Studies at Stanford University. Her books include Was Huck Black? Mark Twain and African American Voices and (edited, with David Bradley) Sport of the Gods and Other Essential Writings by Paul Laurence Dunbar.

Elizabeth Freeman is Professor of English at the University of California–Davis and coeditor of GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies. She is the author of Time Binds: Queer Temporalities, Queer Histories and The Wedding Complex: Forms of Belonging in Modern American Culture, as well as guest editor of a special issue of GLQ, “Queer Temporalities.”

Kevin K. Gaines is Robert Hayden Collegiate Professor of History and Afroamerican and African Studies at the University of Michigan. He is the author of American Africans in Ghana: Black Expatriates and the Civil Rights Era.

Alyshia Gálvez is Associate Professor and Director of the CUNY Institute of Mexican Studies at Lehman College. She is the author of Guadalupe in New York: Devotion and the Struggle for Citizenship Rights among Mexican Immigrants and Patient Citizens, Immigrant Mothers: Mexican Women, Public Prenatal Care, and the Birth Weight Paradox, which was awarded the 2012 Book Award by the Association of Latino and Latin American Anthropologists.

Rosemary Marangoly George was Associate Professor in the Department of Literature at the University of California–San Diego. She was the author of The Politics of Home: Postcolonial Relocations and Twentieth-Century Literature. She passed away in October
2013.

Kirsten Silva Gruesz is Professor of Literature at the University of California–Santa Cruz. She is the author of Ambassadors of Culture: The Transamerican Origins of Latino Writing.

Sandra M. Gustafson is Professor of English, Concurrent Professor of American Studies, and Faculty Fellow at the Kroc Institute of International Peace Studies at the University of Notre Dame. Her most recent book is Imagining Deliberative Democracy in the Early American Republic.

Matthew Pratt Guterl is Professor of Africana Studies and American Studies at Brown University. He is the author of American Mediterranean: Southern Slaveholders in the Age of Emancipation and, more recently, Josephine Baker and the Rainbow Tribe.

Jack Halberstam is Professor of American Studies and Ethnicity at the University of Southern California. When not trying to compress an entire cultural history into one keyword, Halberstam works on subcultures, queer epistemologies, music, and visual media. Halberstam’s most recent books are The Queer Art of Failure and Gaga Feminism, and Halberstam’s next book will be a cultural appraisal of queer anarchy titled The Wild.

Glenn Hendler is Associate Professor and Chair in the English Department at Fordham University, where he also teaches in the American Studies Program. He is the author of Public Sentiments: Structures of Feeling in Nineteenth-Century American Literature.

Scott Herring is Associate Professor of English at Indiana University–Bloomington. He is the author of three books: Queering the Underworld, Another Country, and The Hoarders.

Grace Kyungwon Hong is Associate Professor in the Asian American Studies Department and the Gender Studies Department at the University of California–Los Angeles. Her most recent book is the edited volume Strange Affinities: The Gender and Sexual Politics of Comparative Racialization.

Daniel Martinez HoSang is Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies and Political Science at the University of Oregon. He is the author of Racial Propositions: Ballot Initiatives and the Making of Postwar California.

June Howard is Chair of the Department of American Culture and Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of English, American Culture, and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan–Ann Arbor. Her work on sentimentality appears in Publishing the Family. She is currently finishing a study of literary regionalism with the working title “The Center of the World.”

Elizabeth Hutchinson is Associate Professor of Art History at Barnard College of Columbia University. She is the author of The Indian Craze: Primitivism, Modernism, and Transculturation in American Art, 1890–1915.

Janet R. Jakobsen is Ann Whitney Olin Professor of Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies and Director of the Center for Research on Women at Barnard College. She is the author of Working Alliances and the Politics of Difference: Diversity and Feminist Ethics and coeditor of Love the Sin: Sexual Regulation and the Limits of Religious Tolerance as well as of Secularisms and Interventions: Academics and Activists Respond to Violence.

Susan Jeffords is Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs at University of Washington–Bothell. Her books include The Remasculinization of America: Gender and the Vietnam War and Hard Bodies: Hollywood Masculinity in the Reagan Era. She has just completed a coedited volume with Fahad al-Sumait, Constructing Bin Laden: Global Media and the World’s Most Wanted Man, and is at work on a book titled Angry Americans.

Patrick Johnson is the Carlos Montezuma Professor of Performance Studies and African American Studies at Northwestern University. He is the author of Appropriating Blackness: Performance and the Politics of Authenticity and Sweet Tea: Black Gay Men of the South—An Oral History.

Walter Johnson is Professor of History and African and African American Studies at Harvard University. He is the author of River of Dark Dreams: Slavery and Empire in the Cotton Kingdom.

Miranda Joseph is Associate Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies at the University of Arizona. She is the author of Against the Romance of Community and Debt to Society: Accounting for Life under Capitalism.

Moon-Ho Jung is Associate Professor of History at the University of Washington–Seattle. He is the author of Coolies and Cane: Race, Labor, and Sugar in the Age of Emancipation.

Carla Kaplan is the Davis Distinguished Professor of American Literature at Northeastern University. Her most recent book is Miss Anne in Harlem: The White Women of the Black Renaissance.

J. Kēhaulani Kauanui is Associate Professor in the Departments of American Studies and Anthropology at Wesleyan University. She is the author of Hawaiian Blood: Colonialism and the Politics of Sovereignty and Indigeneity.

David Kazanjian is Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature and Literary Theory at the University of Pennsylvania. He is the author of The Colonizing Trick: National Culture and Imperial Citizenship in Early America and The Brink of Freedom: Improvising Life in the Nineteenth-Century Atlantic World.

Kanta Kochhar-Lindgren is Associate Professor in the Theater and Dance Department at Macalester College. Her current art projects—“We Carry the Water,” “Water Theatres,” and “Pier Windows”—focus on the relationships between memory, water, and urban experience. Her written scholarship addresses topics such as water and performance, translation and embodiment, disability and performance, and transnational avant-garde Asian performance histories.

Josh Kun is Professor in the Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism and the Department of American Studies & Ethnicity at the University of Southern California, where he directs the Popular Music Project of the Norman Lear Center. His most recent book is Songs in the Key of Los Angeles: Sheet Music from the Collection of the Los Angeles Public Library.

Oneka LaBennett is Associate Professor of Africana Studies and American Studies at Cornell University. She is coeditor of Racial Formation in the Twenty-First Century, along with Daniel Martinez HoSang and Laura Pulido, and the author of She’s Mad Real: Popular Culture and West Indian Girls in Brooklyn.

George Lipsitz is Professor of Black Studies and Sociology at the University of California–Santa Barbara. His books include How Racism Takes Place, American Studies in a Moment of Danger, The Possessive Investment in Whiteness, and Time Passages. He served as coeditor of the American Crossroads series at the University of California Press and is editor of the Critical American Studies series at the University of Minnesota Press.

Eric Lott is Professor of English at the University of Virginia. His most recent book is Black Mirror: The Cultural Contradictions of American Racism.

Lisa Lowe is Professor of English and American Studies at Tufts University. She is the author of books on race, immigration, and globalization, including the forthcoming The Intimacies of Four Continents.

Eithne Luibhéid is Associate Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies at the University of Arizona. She is the author of Pregnant on Arrival: Making the “Illegal” Immigrant and Entry Denied: Controlling Sexuality at the Border and coeditor of A Global History of Sexuality and Queer Migration: Sexuality, U.S. Citizenship, and Border Crossings.

Sunaina Maira is Professor of Asian American Studies at the University of California–Davis. She is the author of Desis in the House: Indian American Youth Culture in New York City, Missing: Youth, Citizenship, and Empire after 9/11, and Jil [Generation] Oslo: Palestinian Hip Hop, Youth Culture, and the Youth Movement. She coedited Youthscapes: The Popular, the National, and the Global.

Susan Manning is Professor of English, Theatre, and Performance Studies at Northwestern University. She is the author of Modern Dance, Negro Dance: Race in Motion.

Curtis Marez is Professor and Chair of the Ethnic Studies Department at the University of California–San Diego. He is the former editor of American Quarterly and President of the American Studies Association (2013–14). His most recent book is Speculative Technologies: Farm Workers and the Hidden Histories of New Media.

Randy Martin is Professor and Chair of Art and Public Policy and Director of the graduate program in Arts Politics at New York University. He is the author of numerous books on financialization, including the forthcoming Knowledge, LTD: Toward a Social Logic of the Derivative.

Meredith L. McGill is Professor of English at Rutgers University–New Brunswick. She is the author of American Literature and the Culture of Reprinting and the editor of The Traffic in Poems: Nineteenth-Century Poetry and Transatlantic Exchange and Taking Liberties with the Author.

Kembrew McLeod is Professor of Communication Studies at the University of Iowa. He has published and produced several books and documentaries about music and popular culture, and his writings have appeared in the New York Times, Slate, and Rolling Stone. His book Freedom of Expression® received an American Library Association book award, and his documentary Copyright Criminals aired on PBS.

Tara McPherson is Associate Professor in the Critical Studies and Media Arts + Practice Divisions in the University of Southern California’s School of Cinematic Arts. Her coedited collection, Transmedia Frictions, and monograph, Designing for Difference, are forthcoming.

Robert McRuer is Professor of English and Chair of the Department of English at The George Washington University. He is the author of Crip Theory: Cultural Signs of Queerness and Disability and coeditor, with Anna Mollow, of Sex and Disability. He is completing a book tentatively titled Cripping Austerity.

Leerom Medovoi is Professor and Department Head of English at the University of Arizona. He was the founding director of the Portland Center for Public Humanities. He is the author of Rebels: Youth and the Cold War Origins of Identity. He is at work on a book titled The Second Axis of Race: Biopolitics of the Dogma Line.

Jodi Melamed is Associate Professor of English and Africana Studies at Marquette University. She is the author of Represent and Destroy: Rationalizing Violence in the New Racial Capitalism.

Timothy Mitchell is Professor in the Department of Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies at Columbia University. His most recent book is Carbon Democracy: Political Power in the Age of Oil.

Fred Moten is Professor of English at the University of California–Riverside. He is the author of In the Break: The Aesthetics of the Black Radical Tradition and coauthor, with Stefano Harney, of The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning and Black Study.

Lisa Nakamura is Professor of Screen Arts and Cultures and American Cultures at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She is the author of Digitizing Race: Visual Cultures of the Internet, which won the Asian American Studies Association 2010 book award in cultural studies, and Cybertypes: Race, Ethnicity, and Identity on the Internet and is coeditor of Race in Cyberspace and Race after the Internet.

Christopher Newfield is Professor of American Studies at the University of California–Santa Barbara. His most recent book is Unmaking the Public University: The Forty-Year Assault on the Middle Class.

Tavia Nyong’o is Associate Professor of Performance Studies at New York University, where he teaches courses on African American art and culture, queer studies, and popular music. The author of The Amalgamation Waltz: Race, Performance, and the Ruses of Memory, he is completing a manuscript titled “Dark Days: Race against Time in Black Art, Cinema, and Performance since the Sixties.” He is coeditor of the journal Social Text.

Donald E. Pease is the Ted & Helen Geisel Professor and Founding Director of the Futures of American Studies Institute at Dartmouth. He is the editor or coeditor of Cultures of United States Imperialism (1992), Futures of American Studies (2002), and Re-framing the Transnational Turn in American Studies (2012) and the author of Visionary Compacts: American Renaissance Writings in Cultural Context (1987) and The New American Exceptionalism (2009). In 2012, the American Studies Association awarded Pease the Carl Bode–Norman Holmes Pearson Prize for Outstanding Contributions to American Studies.

Pamela Perry is a sociologist and independent scholar living in Oakland, California. She is the author of Shades of White: White Kids and Racial Identities in High School.

Carla L. Peterson is Professor of English and affiliate faculty in the departments of Women’s Studies, American Studies, and African American Studies at the University of Maryland. She is the author of “Doers of the Word”: African American Women Speakers and Writers in the North (1830–1880) and Black Gotham: A Family History of African Americans in Nineteenth-Century New York City.

Vijay Prashad is Professor of International Studies and George and Martha Kellner Chair in South Asian History at Trinity College. His most recent books include The Poorer Nations: A Possible History of the Global South and Uncle Swami: South Asians in America Today.

Junaid Rana is Associate Professor of Asian American Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is the author of Terrifying Muslims: Race and Labor in the South Asian Diaspora.

Chandan Reddy is Associate Professor of English and Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies at the University of Washington–Seattle. He is the author of Freedom with Violence: Race, Sexuality, and the U.S. State, which won awards from the Modern Language Association and the Asian American Studies Association. He is currently at work on a new book, Burials of Globalization: Race, Rights, and the Failures of Culture.

Bruce Robbins is Old Dominion Foundation Professor in the Humanities in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. His most recent book is Perpetual War: Cosmopolitanism from the Viewpoint of Violence. He is also the director of the documentary film Some of My Best Friends Are Zionists.

Juana María Rodríguez is Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies at the University of California–Berkeley. Her most recent book is Sexual Futures, Queer Gestures, and Other Latina Longings.

Valerie Rohy is Professor of English at the University of Vermont. Her most recent book is Anachronism and Its Others: Sexuality, Race, Temporality.

David F. Ruccio is Professor of Economics at the University of Notre Dame and a former editor of the journal Rethinking Marxism. Among his recent books is Development and Globalization: A Marxian Class Analysis.

Susan M. Ryan is Associate Professor and Vice Chair of English at the University of Louisville. She is completing a book project titled The Moral Economies of American Authorship.

Jentery Sayers is Assistant Professor of English and Director of the Maker Lab in the Humanities at the University of Victoria. His work has appeared in American Literature, Digital Studies, e-Media Studies, Computational Culture, The New Work of Composing, the International Journal of Learning and Media, Victorian Review, and Kairos: Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy, among others.

David S. Shields is McClintock Professor of Southern Literature and Chairman of the Carolina Gold Rice Foundation. His recent monographs are Still: American Silent Motion Picture Photography and Southern Provisions: On the Creation and Revival of a Regional Cuisine.

Caroline Chung Simpson is Associate Professor of English at the University of Washington–Seattle. She is the author of An Absent Presence: Japanese Americans in Postwar American Culture, 1945–1960 and is currently working on a book about Asian women in the American South.

Nikhil Pal Singh is Associate Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis and History at New York University. He is the author of Black Is a Country: Race and the Unfinished Struggle for Democracy and editor of Climbin’ Jacob’s Ladder: The Black Freedom Movement Writings of Jack O’Dell.

Stephanie Smallwood is Dio Richardson Professor and Associate Professor in the Department of History at the University of Washington–Seattle. She is the author of Saltwater Slavery: A Middle Passage from Africa to American Diaspora.

Caleb Smith is Professor of English and American Studies at Yale University. He is working on an edition of a nineteenth-century prison narrative, “The Life and Adventures of a Haunted Convict.”

Siobhan B. Somerville is Associate Professor of English and Gender and Women’s Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and an affiliated faculty member in the Department of African American Studies and the Unit for Criticism and Interpretive Theory. She is the author of Queering the Color Line: Race and the Invention of Homosexuality in American Culture and coeditor of several special issues of journals, most recently “Queering the Middle: Race, Region, and Sexual Diasporas,” a special issue of GLQ.

Dean Spade is Associate Professor at the Seattle University School of Law. He is the author of Normal Life: Administrative Violence, Critical Trans Politics, and the Limits of Law.

Amy Dru Stanley is Professor of History at the University of Chicago. She is the author of From Bondage to Contract: Wage Labor, Marriage, and the Market in the Age of Slave Emancipation. Her current book project explores human rights in the age of slave emancipation.

Shelley Streeby is Professor in the Departments of Literature and Ethnic Studies at the University of California–San Diego. Her most recent book is Radical Sensations: World Movements, Violence, and Visual Culture.

John Kuo Wei Tchen is founding director of the Asian/Pacific/American Studies Institute and Program at New York University. He is cofounder of the Museum of Chinese in America (MOCA). He is coeditor of Yellow Peril! An Archive of Anti-Asian Fear and chief historian for a New-York Historical Society traveling exhibition on the origins and legacy of the Chinese Exclusion Act (1882).

Paul Thomas is Professor Emeritus of Political Science at the University of California–Berkeley. He is the coauthor (with David Lloyd) of Culture and the State.

Thuy Linh Tu is Associate Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis at New York University. She is the author of The Beautiful Generation: Asian Americans and the Cultural Economy of Fashion (2011) and is currently working on a new project about the multinational cosmetics industry, “The Landscapes of Hope: Beauty, Bodies, and Buildings.”

Priscilla Wald is Professor of English and Women’s Studies at Duke University. She is the author of Constituting Americans: Cultural Anxiety and Narrative Form and Contagious: Cultures, Carriers, and the Outbreak Narrative. She is currently at work on a book-length study, “Human Being after Genocide.”

Michael Warner is Seymour H. Knox Professor of English Literature and American Studies at Yale University. He is the author of Publics and Counterpublics and coeditor of Varieties of Secularism in a Secular Age.

Robert Warrior is a member of the Osage Nation and Founding President of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association. He is Professor of American Indian Studies, English, and History at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Alys Eve Weinbaum is Associate Professor of English at the University of Washington–Seattle. She is the author of Wayward Reproductions: Genealogies of Race and Nation in Transatlantic Modern Thought and is completing a book titled The Afterlife of Slavery: Human Reproduction in Biocapitalism.

Henry Yu is Associate Professor of History and Principal of St. John’s College at the University of British Columbia. He is the author of Thinking Orientals: Race, Migration, and Contact in Modern America.

George Yúdice is Professor and Chair of Modern Languages and Literatures and Latin American Studies at the University of Miami, where he is also Director of the Miami Observatory on Communication and Creative Industries. He is the author of Cultural Policy, The Expediency of Culture: Uses of Culture in the Global Era, Nuevas tecnologías, música y experiencia, and Culturas emergentes en el mundo hispano de Estados Unidos.

Sandra A. Zagarell is Donald R. Longman of English at Oberlin College. A senior editor of the Heath Anthology of American Literature, she publishes on postbellum regionalism, on narratives of community, and, most recently, on the queer Americanness of Henry James’s The Portrait of a Lady.